The Personal Recipes of Pablo Picasso

Food, much like painting, is a form of art. There is time, dedication, and pride that go into the making of an exquisite meal that is not lost on famous artists. Pablo Picasso has released some of his personal recipes in an interview with Vouge. He is one of many artists that have a knack for cooking, among Jackson Pollock, Salvador Dali, Marcel Duchamp, etc. While Dali and Pollock have released their own cookbooks, Picasso’s recipes went into the Modern Art Cookbook which features recipes of the famous artists of the 2oth century.

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The Modern Cookbook by Mary Ann Caws

Once, Picasso had lunch with Alice B. Toklas who decided to serve a dish that included her dressing up a bass with cream, herbs, and a red mayonnaise sauce. She decorated the serving platter with her boiled eggs, a tomato paste, and truffles in a way that she believed would impress Picasso. Upon seeing the platter, Picasso remarked in the beauty of the dish. This was not the only time that the look of the dish presented to him was complimented. Another time his wife, Jaqueline, made him an eel stew and impressed by its beauty Picasso decided to paint it rather than eat it.

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Pichet et Coupe de Fruits, Pablo Picasso, 1931

Picasso sees beauty in everything, even the seemingly random. He manipulates what he is looking at so that he is proud of his work and it fits into his personal style. By believing that you should have a sense of pride in all that you do, Pablo Picasso mastered a few of his own recipes in that he enjoyed serving to others as well as eating himself. Feeling confident about his art was carried over into his work in the kitchen and to his palate when savoring a meal. He would never serve something that he wasn’t satisfied with.

Some of Picasso’s famous recipes include:

Picasso’s Omelette Tortilla Niçoise

6 tablespoons olive oil
1 large onion
4 peppers, red and green
3 tomatoes
2 tablespoons wine vinegar
8 eggs
Salt and pepper

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Polychrome Bird, Pablo Picasso,1947

Picasso’s Eel Stew

6 tablespoons olive oil
6 tablespoons butter
12 small white onions
1 teaspoon sugar
2 yellow onions, chopped
12 mushrooms
⅓ pound salt pork, cubed
2 shallots, minced
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 eels of about 1 pound each, cut into four- to five-inch sections
1 bottle of good red wine
1 tablespoon flour
Salt, pepper, cayenne pepper
Bouquet garni: thyme, bay leaf, parsley, fennel, and a small branch of celery

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Poisson de Chine, Pablo Picasso, 1952

Picasso’s Herb Soup

2 bunches radishes
2 handfuls chervil
1 bunch sorrel
2 cloves garlic
2 soupspoons olive oil
1 egg yolk
6 slices toast (optional)
Salt and freshly ground pepper

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Visage dans un carré, Pablo Picasso, 1956

 

 

3 Minute Art History Lesson: Salvador Dalí

Salvador Dalí is considered one of the most recognized artists to have ever lived and the most famous Surrealist artist. Along with his artistic career, his home and married life are very different than what was expected in the 1900s. He was born in 1904, 9 months after his older brothers death and was given the same name as him. When he was 5 his parents told him that he was the reincarnation of his brother. Dalí’s mother died of breast cancer when he was 16 and he was greatly affected by it because she was the biggest supporter of his art and encouraged his eccentric behavior.

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Apparition of Face and Fruit Dish on the Beach, 1938, Oil on Canvas, 45 x 57 in.

His original artistic influence were the Renaissance masters but he believed that once an artist masters the fundamentals they are able to break the rules, which he did. Upon becoming a Surrealist artist his influences became Pablo Picasso, Joan Miró, Diego Velázquez, and Sigmund Freud. Dalí met his wife Gala in 1929 and she became his biggest muse and inspiration during his career. Gala was a Russian immigrant and 10 years his senior and for many years Dalí’s father greatly disapproved of their relationship and marriage. She managed many business aspects of Dalí’s art making them business partners as well as husband and wife.

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Galatea of the Spheres, 1952, Oil on Canvas, 26 x 21 in.

For years Dalí and Gala moved all across the country while Dalí worked on numerous projects and presented his art all around the world. They moved back to Spain in 1948 where they remained until their death. Intrigued by math, science, and optical illusions, Dalí’s work often included these subjects along with symbolism. He used animals to represent things like desire, death, fear, sexuality, and reality. His use of an egg represents hope and love while his clocks were modeled after melting Camembert cheese and symbolize the relativity of time.

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Elephants Reflecting Swans, 1937, Oil on Canvas, 20 x 30 in

Dalí had many fears of abandonment and they got worse as Gala’s health, followed by his, declined. At 76 Gala gave Dalí a dangerous amount of unprescribed medicine leaving him with Parkinson like symptoms, damaging his nervous system, and making it so he was eventually no longer able to create art. In 1982 Gala, Dalí’s one and only muse, died causing Dalí to lose his will to live and had multiple incidents that were possible suicide attempts. In 1989 Dalí died of heart failure at 84 years old.

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Lincoln in Dalivison (Gala Contemplating the Mediterranean Sea), 1976, Oil on Canvas, 99 1/4 x 75 1/2 in.

Dalí left a great impact on the art world with his Surrealist creations. Not only was he extremely eccentric, but he had incredible talent. He contributed to the arts in sculpture, theater, fashion, film, painting, and photography. Even today he is still a huge inspiration to many artists and has several museum and exhibits presenting his work all around the world.

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The Persistence of Memory, 1931, Oil on Canvas, 9 x 13 in.