3 Tips To Get Your Art Collection Started The Right Way

 

 

Jennifer Stoner Interiors/John Magor Photography. Post 108, No. 1, oil on canvas, 60x48, 2009.

Jennifer Stoner Interiors/John Magor Photography. Post 108, No. 1, oil on canvas, 60×48, 2009.

Collecting and displaying art for your home makes you the curator of your own exhibit, except this exhibit is an extension of yourself.

They say that you don’t buy a piece of art, you invest in it… and while this sounds like a cliché, in reality, it can’t be more true. Artwork of good quality will not only enhance your personal environment, it will also stay with you for generations to come.

Art isn’t just meant to be beautiful, it should speak to something deeper within you-evoking a cherished memory or feeling.

Art is meaningful and for that reason it should be treated with respect in your household. So how do you go about finding the perfect piece of art for your home?

First thing’s first- change your mindset! Many choose art in order to fit alongside or “match” their home. But remember you’re making an investment! The art you choose shouldn’t be based on any other factor than the piece speaks to you in some way and for that reason, you choose to display it in your home. It isn’t meant as simply “decor,” it creates atmosphere– while your furniture or wall color might change, if bought properly, your art display will not.

A beautiful Javier Cabada painting site perfectly in the center of a large living room, acting as a burst of color and a focal point!

A beautiful Javier Cabada painting sits perfectly in the center of a large living room, acting as a burst of color and a focal point!

Do your research! If you’re truly looking to buy a piece of art that will not only stay with you for years (if not generations) to come, you must know what you are getting yourself into before you purchase! Work with an art dealer or gallery, look into the background/predicted future of the artist who created the work, and discuss how to hang or present it! Not only do you want to make sure you get a return on your investment, you also want to know exactly how to handle your new acquisition. You can never get too much help, especially if you’re just getting started collecting. *Plus* When guests ask about that amazing piece hanging in your living room, you’ll know exactly what to say about it.

Viewers Look at a Hebert Sanchez Painting at the Aquamarine Exhibition

Viewers Look at a Hebert Sanchez Painting, Aquamarine Exhibition, Aaron Gallery

Don’t let anyone else influence your decision- while it is important to be informed about the pieces you buy and receiving help can’t hurt, always remember to trust yourself in the end. Art is a completely subjective experience, both to the artist and the viewer. It is important that you always go with your gut about purchasing a piece because in the end, it’s you and your family who will be looking at it most. If you find that a piece is a good investment but you can’t find it in your heart to say you love the work, don’t do it! You’ll know the right piece of art when you see it.

 

 

Do you have any tips for displaying art or your own photos to share? Comment below!

5 Book Recommendations Based On Your Favorite Artist

If you love…

 

Jean-Michel Basquiat

 

© 2016 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

© 2016 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Algonquin Books (March 8, 2016)

Algonquin Books (March 8, 2016)

We Love You Charlie Freeman is a book that tackles race and language, much like Basquiat’s work which developed from his poetic street art of NYC. Kaitlyn Greenidge writes about an african american family asked to raise and teach sign language to a chimpanzee at a New England Research Institute whose dark history challenges readers. This novel explores heavy topics with a graceful humor and contemplation.

 

 

Salvador Dali

Salvador Dalí Lobster Telephone, 1938 West Dean College - part of The Edward James Foundation Group © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York 2015

Salvador Dalí
Lobster Telephone, 1938
West Dean College – part of The Edward James Foundation Group
© Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York 2015

Riverhead Books; First Edition edition (September 15, 2015)

Riverhead Books; First Edition edition (September 15, 2015)

 

Master of the unconscious mind, Dali’s work was heavily based on symbolism and dreams, trying to understand the surreal elements of what we call reality. If you enjoy his mind-bending art, Lauren Groff’s Fates and Furies is for you. Filled with mythological elements and a psychologically sharp take on domesticity, this is one book bound to leave you wanting more.

 

Claude Monet

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Theodore M. Davis Collection, Bequest of Theodore M. Davis, 1915

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Theodore M. Davis Collection, Bequest of Theodore M. Davis, 1915

 

Back Bay Books; Reprint edition (February 7, 2011) Elizabeth Bard

Back Bay Books; Reprint edition (February 7, 2011)
Elizabeth Bard

If you like Monet’s soft but deconstructed landscapes then Elizabeth Bard’s Lunch in Paris is a must read for you. A humorous memoir filled with the romance of paris and being abroad all the while tackling real life issues, like not knowing where you fit in the world. This book is separated into chapters by recipes that Bard collected (or created) herself and is sure to inspire as much as entertain.

 

Johannes Vermeer

Johannes Vermeer (Dutch, 1632 - 1675 ), Woman Holding a Balance, c. 1664, oil on canvas, Widener Collection 1942.9.97

Johannes Vermeer (Dutch, 1632 – 1675 ), Woman Holding a Balance, c. 1664, oil on canvas, Widener Collection 1942.9.97

Back Bay Books (April 7, 2015), Donna Tartt

Back Bay Books (April 7, 2015), Donna Tartt

The Goldfinch tells the story of a young man’s life growing up in New York City- filled with love, loss, thievery, and Dutch paintings, this book will keep you entranced just like Vermeer’s beautiful paintings do. It is a smartly done and meticulous book that will keep readers turning pages, grieving and laughing alongside characters; This book will not disappoint.

 

Leonardo Da Vinci

The Louvre, Leonardo Da Vinci

The Louvre, Leonardo Da Vinci

Pocket Books; Reissue edition (August 25, 2015)

Pocket Books; Reissue edition (August 25, 2015)

If you like Da Vinci’s methodical and calculated artworks then Kathy Reich’s Deja Dead is the book you’ll want to read. Written by a forensic anthropologist, this hit novel from the 90’s is smart and full of surprises. The novel (plus the many more after this one in the series) follows a forensic anthropologist on her quest to solve a case that becomes personal. It is captivating and sure to keep you on the edge of your seat.